Tag: iscsi

Connect Drobo B800i to CentOS 7 via iSCSI

Drobo Dashboard
CentOS 7.4.1708 Kernel 3.10.0.-693.11.1.el7.x64_86
Drobo B800i Firmware 2.0.6

The Drobo and the host computer must be on the same subnet in order for this to work. (See Drobo Online User Guide)

Preparation

After configuring the device’s IP and other settings via USB from my Windows desktop using Drobo Dashboard, I created a 1TB, unformatted volume.

Format Dialog box

Information you’ll need to connect to machine:

  • Target Name
  • IP address of device

I did not enable CHAP, but it can be easily configured on the machine. I also disabled SELinux on this test box.

**note** your Drobo must be on the same subnet as your server.

I installed the iscsi initiator utilities.

$ sudo yum install -y scsi-target-utils

Configure the server

On the CentOS server, install the iscsi package

# yum -y install iscsi-initiator-utils

List out the /proc/partitions file to see the devices that you have currently. Once you login to the iSCSI volume, a new one will appear and that’s the one we’ll format.

# cat /proc/partitions

Add the target name to /etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi file, save and exit.

#  vim  /etc/iscsi/initiatorname.iscsi
InitiatorName=iqn.2005-06.com.drobo:b800i.tdb1504b0092.id1

iscsiadm discovery command

Use the iscsiadm command to discover the target.

# iscsiadm -m discovery -t  sendtargets -p 10.253.53.25

Once your volumes are discovered, you can login to them

# iscsiadm -m node -T iqn.2005-06.com.drobo:b800i.tdb1504b0092.id1 -p 10.253.52.25 --login

List out the /proc/partitions file to see the new disk.

# cat /proc/partition

 

Command to display partitions

command to login the iscsi target

If the login is successful, run the dmesg | tail command to see if the kernel sees the logical blocks.

# dmesg | tail

Time to partition the device. 

Run the parted command against the device to create a new disk label. Run It again to create the primary partition

# parted --script  /dev/sdb mklabel msdos
# parted --script  /dev/sdb mklabel primary 0% 100%

If by chance you get an error that reads:

Warning: The resulting partition is not properly aligned for best performance

Read this blog post and make the adjustments. 2048s is a good choice for the starting sector.

Check the disk alignment

# parted /dev/sdb align-check optimal 1

If it returns 1 aligned, you’re good to go.

Format your disk

# mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb1

*note* I’d read that this Drobo didn’t support ext4 and after formatting the volume, I found that to be false.

Mount your disk

# mount /dev/sdb1 /drobo

Confirm that you can write to it

# touch /drobo/testfile

Check the  file system disk space usage.

# df -hT

*Notes & Caveats*

  • All volumes on the Drobo were ‘visible’ in file manager. If you have multiple volumes on the target, you’ll see them all in GUI file manager.
  • They have a different name after each reboot /dev/sdb1 or /dev/sdc1,
  • Adding it to /fstab didn’t matter, since the name changed after every reboot.
  • They show as ‘on my computer’ and when I click on the drive, it mounts to /run/media/username/some-really-long-number-and-series-of-letters. The media directory isn’t even present  under the/ run director after a reboot. It only appears once I click on the disk in the file manager.
  • I’ve read a few blogs where it’s better to present the Drobo as 1 large volume to a Linux system.
  • I formatted it as ext3 just fine. I’d read in another blog that it doesn’t support ext4. I didn’t find a definitive answer in the online guide to confirm or deny it until I saw the above mentioned alert in the dashboard.

You can set the target to login and mount at boot by editing the /etc/fstab and by using the iscsiadm command to set it to automatic.

 

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EqualLogic Cloning an Inbound Replica

I have a dev server that’s my sandbox for VMware VCA studying. This Dell PowerEdge 2900 is on it’s last leg. It has an iSCSI disk that houses a bunch of ISOs, installers, docs, etc that is being replicated to another EQL array. The old PE is located behind my desk and is loud as a 747 taking off when it powers up.I will NOT miss this thing at ALL!

I have a new PowerEdge R420 that I’ve moved my development environment to and it lives in an offsite data center. I want my iSCSI disk attached to my new server, but I don’t want to stop replication on my current disk until the server is wiped and hauled off. The beauty of EqualLogic is their arrays are wonderfully easy to administer and makes any takes relatively easy.

Since the disk is replicated and I don’t want it to stop replicating right away, but still would like to have the current data to use and access immediately on my new server. Yes, I could have mapped a drive, but if the 2900 dies, I’m still up and running without even a hitch.

That’s where cloning an inbound replica comes in.

From the outbound group manager, make sure you’ve replicated your volume.

confirm_volume_replicated

From the inbound group manager, Go to replication and expand inbound replicas. Select your replica so the information appears in the right pane. Click clone replica.

clone_replica

The wizard will guide you through the process of cloning your replica. On step 2, change the snapshot reserve if you need to. Step 4, review the summary and click finish.

change_snap_reserve

finish_clone_replica

Your new volume will appear in the volume list. Present it to the new server if you didn’t during the clone volume replica wizard and you’re in business.

 

new_vol

 

 

 

 

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